The Centre for Biblical Linguistics, Translation, and Exegesis is affiliated with a number of different publications.

Biblical and Ancient Greek Linguistics

BAGL is an international, refereed journal that exists to further the application of modern linguistics to the study of Ancient and Biblical Greek, with a particular focus on the analysis of texts, including but not restricted to the Greek New Testament.

  • BAGL is hosted online by CBLTE, but it is also printed by Wipf & Stock.
  • It is open to all scholars, not just those connected to the Centre, and it welcomes the use of a wide range of linguistic theories and methods, including not only functional approaches but anything that fits within the purview of modern lingusitics.

Linguistic Biblical Studies

The monograph series Linguistic Biblical Studies (LBS) is published by Brill and co-edited by Stanley E. Porter. It is dedicated to the development and promotion of linguistically informed study of the Bible in its original languages. The series welcomes monograph-length studies and collections of essays in the major areas of linguistics, such as

  • syntax
  • semantics
  • pragmatics
  • discourse analysis and text linguistics
  • corpus linguistics
  • cognitive linguistics
  • comparative linguistics, etc.

Also, any theoretical linguistic approach will be considered, both formal and functional.

Filología Neotestamentaria

FN is an international, refereed journal hosted at the University of Córdoba, Spain. Stanley E. Porter serves as one of the journal’s editors. Its scope encompasses every aspect of the following topics and more:

  • New Testament Greek philology
  • textual criticism
  • traditional grammar
  • semiotics, etc.

It welcomes submissions that employ linguistic theories or methods.

Scholarship by CBLTE Fellows

In addition to these publication venues, there are publications authored by the fellows of CBLTE. We list these in order to demonstrate the breadth of research that is being carried out by people associated with the Centre.

  • PUBLICATIONS BY CBLTE FELLOWS

    Check back frequently for updated publications from CBLTE fellows!

    Recent publications (2015–present):

  • BIBLICAL AND ANCIENT GREEK LINGUISTICS

    biblical and ancient greek linguistics banner

    Biblical and Ancient Greek Linguistics (BAGL) is a fully refereed on-line and print journal specializing in widely disseminating the latest advances in linguistic study of ancient and biblical Greek. Under the senior editorship of Professor Dr. Stanley E. Porter and Dr. Matthew Brook O’Donnell, along with its assistant editors and editorial board, BAGL looks to publish significant work that advances knowledge of ancient Greek through the utilization of modern linguistic methods. Accepted pieces are in the first instance posted on-line in page-consistent pdf format, and then (except for reviews) are published in print form each volume year. This permits timely posting of the most recent work in Greek linguistics, while also ensuring that the electronic versions can be cited in a manner consistent with those made available in permanent print form.

    Volume Eight (2019)
    Volume Seven (2018)
    Volume Six (2017)
    Volume Five (2016)
    Volume Four (2015)
    Volume Three (2014)
    Volume Two (2013)
    Volume One (2012)

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  • LINGUISTIC BIBLICAL STUDIES

    The series, Linguistic Biblical Stuidies, co-edited by Stanley E. Porter, Jesús Peláez and Jonathan M. Watt, is dedicated to the development and promotion of linguistically informed study of the Bible in its original languages. Biblical studies has greatly benefited from modern theoretical and applied linguistics, but stands poised to benefit from further integration of the two fields of study. Most linguistics has studied contemporary languages, and attempts to apply linguistic methods to study of ancient languages requires systematic re-assessment of their approaches. This series is designed to address such challenges, by providing a venue for linguistically based analysis of the languages of the Bible. As a result, monograph-length studies and collections of essays in the major areas of linguistics, such as syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse analysis and text linguistics, corpus linguistics, cognitive linguistics, comparative linguistics, and the like, will be encouraged, and any theoretical linguistic approach will be considered, both formal and functional. Primary consideration is given to the Greek of the New and Old Testaments and of other relevant ancient authors, but studies in Hebrew, Coptic, and other related languages will be entertained as appropriate.

    Recent Volumes:

  • FILOLOGÍA NEOTESTAMENTARIA

    The journal, FILOLOGÍA NEOTESTAMENTARIA, co-edited by Jesús Peláez, Stanley E. Porter, and Lautaro Roig Lazillotta, is the result of initiative taken by the Chair of Greek Philology of the Department of Antiquities of the University of Córdoba, Spain. Within its Scope lies every aspect of New Testament Greek philology, namely textual criticism, grammar, semantics, lexicography and eventually semiotics and its relationship with Classical or Hellenistic Greek. It is published in Córdoba (Spain) by EDICIONES EL ALMENDRO DE CÓRDOBA, SL once a year (September).

    Recent Volumes:

     

     

    Volume 51 (2018)

    Volume 50 (2017)

    Volumes 47–48 (2015–2016)

    Volume 47 (2014)

    • Smit, Peter-Ben, and Toon Rensesen, “The passivum divinum: The Rise and Future Fall of an Imaginary Linguistic Phenomenon,” 3–24.
    • Danove, Paul, “Rhetorical Applications of New Testament Verbs of Communication,” 25–40.
    • Hendriks, Wim, “Use of Patristic Evidence in Textual Criticism of the Gospels,” 41–66.
    • Baarda, Tjitze, “‘Fulfilled are the Times.’ A Neglected Varia Lectio in Mark 1:15,” 67–74.
    • Pitts, Andrew, “Tarsus or Jerusalem? A Syntactic Argument for Tarsus as the City of Paul’s Youth in Acts 22:3,” 75–82.
    • Yoon, David I., “Discourse Analysis and the Textual Metafunction: Analyzing the Texture of Galatians 4:12–20,” 83-110.
    • Rius-Camps, Josep, and Jenny Read-Heimeerdinger, “The Variant Readings of the Western Text of the Acts of the Apostles (XXVI)(Acts 20:1—21:14), 111–152.

     

    Volume 46 (2013)

    • Yoon, David I., “Prominence and Markedness in New Testament Discourse,” 3–26.
    • Rudolph, Michael A., “Beyond Guthrie? Text-linguistics and New Testament Studies,” 27–48.
    • Oseka, Mateusz, “Luther’s Textual Study of the Greek New Testament,” 49–60.
    • Cirafesi, Wally V., “Tense-Form Reduction and the Use of ἐποιήσατε in Codex Bezae Matthew 21:13//Mark 1:17,” 61–68.
    • Batovici, Dan, “Eriugena’s Greek Variant Readings of the Fourth Gospel,” 69–86.
    • Bowden, Andrew M., “The Fruit of Righteousness in James: A Study in Discourse Analysis,” 87–108.
    • Williams, Travis B., “Reading Social Conflict through Greek Grammar: Reconciling the Difficulties of the Fourth-Class Condition in 1 Pet 3:14,” 109–126.
    • Rius-Camps, Josep, “The Variant Readings of the Western Text of the Acts of the Apostles (XXV) (Acts 18:24—19:40), 127–163.

     

    Volume 45 (2012)

    • Ladewig, Stratton, “Ancient Witnesses on Deponency in Greek,” 3–20.
    • Hendriks, Wim, “Ευθεως beyond the Temporal Meaning,” 21–36.
    • Ong, Hughson, “An Evaluation of the Aramaic Greek Language Criteria in Historical Jesus Research: A Sociolinguistic Study of Mark 14:32–65,” 37–56.
    • Makujina, John, “’Till Death Do Us Part’? Or the Continuation of Marriage in the Eschaton? Answering Recent Objections to the Traditional Reading of Γαμέω – Γαμίζω in the Synoptic Gospels,” 57–74.
    • Rogers, Trent, “A Syntactical Analysis of οὖν in Papyrus 66,” 75–100.
    • Danove, Paul, The αἰτέω/αἰτέομαι Distinction in the New Testament: A Proposal,” 101–118.
    • Ruis-Camps, Josep, and Jenny Read-Heimerdinger, “The Variant Readings of the Western Text of the Acts of the Apostles (XXIV) (Acts 17:1—18:23), 119-160.

     

    Volume 44 (2011)

    • Schnabel, Eckhard, “The Meaning of βαπτίζειν in Greek, Jewish, and Patristic Literature,” 3–40.
    • Danove, Paul, “The Licensing Properties of New Testament Verbs of Non-Spoken Communication,” 41–58.
    • Koskenniemi, Erkki, “The Famous Liar and the Apostolic Truth,” 59–70.
    • Zoroddu, Donatella, “Il commento di Charles K. Barrett agli Atti degli Apostoli. Note di lettura,” 71–94.
    • Gilson, Andrew, “Scribal Habits in Greek New Testament Manuscripts,” 95–126.
    • Brandâo, Jacyntho Lins, “Aminadab – Aram/Adam – Admin – Arni in Luke 4:33,” 127–134.
    • Ruis-Camps, Josep, and Jenny Read-Heimerdinger, “The Variant Readings of the Western Text of the Acts of the Apostles (XXIII)(Acts 16:1–40),” 135-164.

     

    Volume 43 (2010)

    • Sibinga, Joost Smit, “From Anointing to Arrest. Some Observations on the Composition of Mark 14:1–52,” 3–36.
    • Thiessen, Jacob, “Zorndemonstration Gottes mit Heilsabsicht? Zur Problematik der Syntax und der Bedeutung von Römer 9:22–23,” 37–72.
    • Himes, Paul, “The Use of the Aorist Imperative in the Pastoral Epistles,” 73–92.
    • Whitley, Iwan M., “Zechariah, Reference and the Structure of Revelation 6—8:1,” 93–108.
    • Danove, Paul, “The Interpretation and Translation of Verbs of ‘Giving’ in the New Testament,” 109–128.
    • Pang, Francis G.H., “Aspect, Aktionsart, and Abduction: Future Tense in the New Testament,” 129–160.
    • Levinsohn, Stephen H., “Aspect and Prominence in the Synoptic Accounts of Jesus’ Entry into Jerusalem,” 161–174.
    • Rius-Camps, Josep, and Jenny Read-Heimerdinger, “The Variant Readings of the Western Text of the Acts of the Apostles (XXII) (Acts 14:28—15:41), 175–200.
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